Wiki Wednesday 1-23-08

Time to learn something!

1. Go to Wikipedia.
2. Click on “Random article” in the left-hand sidebar box.
3. Post it!

Well, I’ll be darned – there are actually still a (very) few non-coed colleges in the US that admit only men. Here’s one of them:

Wabash College is a small private liberal arts college for men, located in Crawfordsville, Indiana. Along with Hampden-Sydney College, Deep Springs College, and Morehouse College, Wabash is one of only four remaining mainstream all-men’s liberal arts colleges in the United States.

Wabash College is listed in Loren Pope‘s Colleges That Change Lives.

Wabash College was founded in 1832 by a number of men including several Dartmouth College graduates. It was originally called “The Wabash Teachers Seminary and Manual Labor College.” In the early days a large number of students, deficient in credits, were required to attend the “Preparatory School” of Wabash.

Caleb Mills, the first faculty member, would later come to be known as the father of the Indiana public education system and would work throughout his life to improve education in the Mississippi Valley area. Patterning it after the liberal arts colleges of New England, they resolved “that the institution be at first a classical and English high school, rising into a college as soon as the wants of the country demand.” After declaring the site at which they were standing would be the location of the new school, they knelt in the snow and conducted a dedication service. Although Mills, like many of the founders, was a Presbyterian minister, they were committed that Wabash should be independent and non-sectarian.

Elihu Baldwin was the first President of Wabash from 1835 until 1840. He came from a New York City church and accepted the Presidency even though he knew that Wabash was threatened with bankruptcy. He met the challenge and gave thorough study to the “liberal arts program” at Wabash. After his death, he was succeeded by Charles White, a graduate of Dartmouth College, and the brother-in-law of Edmund O. Hovey, a professor at the college.

Joseph F. Tuttle, after whom Tuttle Grade School in Crawfordsville was named in 1906, (and Tuttle Middle School in 1960), became President of Wabash College in 1862 and served for 30 years. “He was an eloquent preacher, a sound administrator and an astute handler of public relations.” Joseph Tuttle, together with his administrators, worked to improve relations in Crawfordsville between “Town and Gown.”

“Founded in 1832, Wabash College is an independent and selective liberal arts college for men with an enrollment of 900 students. Its mission is excellence in teaching and learning within a community built on close and caring relationships among students, faculty, and staff.” This mission manifests itself in the College’s motto: ‘Wabash College educates men to think critically, act responsibly, lead effectively, and live humanely.’

“Wabash offers qualified young men a superior education, fostering, in particular, independent intellectual inquiry, critical thought, and clear written and oral expression. The College educates its students broadly in the traditional curriculum of the liberal arts while also requiring them to pursue concentrated study in one or more disciplines. Wabash emphasizes [its] manifold but shared cultural heritage. [Wabash] students come from diverse economic, social, and cultural backgrounds; the College helps these students engage these differences and live humanely with them. Wabash also challenges its students to appreciate the changing nature of the global society and prepares them for the responsibilities of leadership and service in it.

“The College carries out its mission in a residential setting in which students take personal and group responsibility for their actions. Wabash provides for its students an unusually informal, egalitarian, and participatory environment which encourages young men to adopt a life of intellectual and creative growth, self-awareness, and physical activity. The College seeks to cultivate qualities of character and leadership in students by developing not only their analytical skills, but also sensitivity to values, and judgment and compassion required of citizens living in a difficult and uncertain world. We expect a Wabash education to bring joy in the life of the mind, to reveal the pleasures in the details of common experience, and to affirm the necessity for and rewards in helping others.”

Want to know more? It’s all right here.

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